13 May 2013

Great new NSRI Advert with a whole lot of Hout Bay!

Great new NSRI Advert with a whole lot of Hout Bay! Show them some support click here

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20 Feb 2013

She is coming home to Hout Bay

She is coming home to Hout Bay

Taken from nsri.org.za:

Hout Bay’s 10 metre Brede, Nadine Gordimer, is back in the water after a complete refit at Treetops Marine. She has new engines, new electrical and fuel systems and a complete respray. Her sea trials and final paper work will be completed and she should be back on station this weekend.

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24 Jan 2012

Sailor assisted by NSRI Hout Bay has his say

Sailor assisted by NSRI Hout Bay has his say

To Whom it May Concern;

The 17 January, “NSRI Station 8 are the angels of Hout Bay” needs some clarifications.  First, the name of my sail boat is not Akuido and my surname is not Loana.  Second, my boat never came closer than half a nautical mile (.9 kilometer) of Vulcan Rock.  Her course at the time I asked for assistance would have taken me clear of the rock by about 3/4 of a nautical mile (1.4 kilometers) west of the same.  Third, while it may have appeared I had absolutely no control over my boat’s direction of travel, this is not the case.  Taken from my gps track history and recreated using turning points from this history is an accurate reproduction of my boat’s travel before and after assistance was rendered.  While my sail was damaged, it was still servicable enough for me to control direction of travel – determined by whether I was on a port or starboard tack.  I assumed a starboard tack as soon as I heard the assist vessels were on the way.  This was done in order
to reduce the distance I would travel away from them, and in fact close the distance somewhat in the time it would take for them to arrive.  The reason I asked for assistance is because the wind strength at approximately 50 knots was capable of rendering my already damaged sail useless.  A request to lower the sail was received by me from one of the assist vessels, and in the course of lowering the sail significantly more damage was evident than before. Once the sail was lowered my boat was vulnerable to waves arriving on her beam.  This is because it is necessary to have a sail up in order to point the bow into wind and waves.  Still, her direction of travel would change depending upon which tack she was on.  So, even with the sail down control over direction of travel remained.

If there was ever any consideration by anyone to order me to abandon my boat, I was not informed.  Furthermore, the least depth of Tafelberg shoal at 7.8 meters (24′) presented no possibility of a grounding since my vessel’s draft is 3 feet 6 inches…  There was never any hazard of me going aground or colliding with Vulcan Rock.  Please refer to the attached photos for evidence supporting what I have said.

Finally, given the fact wind velocity increased to 60 knots or more during the time my boat was being towed to safety, my decision to request assistance was the best decision I could have made.

Thank you.
Bob Lorenzi
S/V Armido
Hout Bay Marina,
Hout Bay, S.A.

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17 Jan 2012

NSRI Station 8 are the angels of Hout Bay

NSRI Station 8 are the angels of Hout Bay

Taken from nsri.org.za:

Solo yachtsman rescued off Hout Bay:

At 18h55 on Monday 16th January Hout Bay duty crew were called out following a request for assistance from the San Diego, USA, solo yachtsman Bob Loana, aboard his yacht AKUIDO with a split mainsail.

His yachts engine was not coping in the sea conditions and the yacht was being blown sideways, struggling in a wild sea with gale force South Easterly winds gusting to more than 65 knots. He was 2.5 nautical miles South East of Vulcan Rock and at serious risk of running onto it.

Our Hout Bay volunteers launched MTU NADINE GORDIMER and ALBIE MATTHEWS and on arrival we found the yacht being blown across the bay like a leaf in the wind bucking and pitching and having covered over 1.5 nautical miles in the 20 minutes it took our sea rescue craft to reach him.

A tow-line was rigged to the yacht from our sea rescue craft but on three occasions the tow-line snapped and the V-shaped bridle on the sea rescue craft broke twice. A 12mm thick stainless steel safety snap hook bent and snapped and had to be discarded. With slow progress, making only 1 knot, and having to re-attach the tow-line on numerous occasions, it was seriously considered to order the yachtsman to abandon ship after the yacht came close to running aground. The yacht was finely brought into the safety of Hout Bay harbour at 22h00.

Bob Loana, who lives on his yacht, was returning to Hout Bay after “having such a good time there in 2003″, he said.

Docking first in Durban and then last port of call Mossel Bay he was close to his destination when his mainsail tore in the gale force winds causing the rescue operation to be launched.

Bob commended the NSRI Hout Bay volunteer sea rescue crew saying that it was the best teamwork and rescue operation he had witnessed in some of the most trying conditions he had ever found himself in.

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09 Jan 2012

NSRI in Hout Bay kept busy

NSRI in Hout Bay kept busy

Taken from NSRI.org.za,

Hout Bay volunteers, Cape Town Fire and Rescue Services and the SA Police Force responded, at 12h28, to Hout Bay Main Beach following reports of two children in difficulties in the water.
On arrival a 9 year old boy was treated for near drowning symptoms and hypothermia and a Metro EMS ambulance was summoned. Two boys, a 9 year old and a 7 year old, both from Imizamo Yethu, had been rescued from the water by a local stand-up paddle boarder, who had spotted the children in difficulties in the water. It appears that they had both been swept out to sea by strong rip-currents while swimming.

Because of traffic congestion and an urgent need to get the 9 year old boy, who was in a critical condition, to hospital the Metro EMS Skymed helicopter was summoned and he has been airlifted to hospital by Skymed in a stable but serious condition.

The 7 year old was released by paramedics on-scene, he was in a satisfactory condition, and released into the care of Law Enforcement officers who will attempt to track down the children’s parents.

It appears that both children were swimming at the beach with no parental control or adult supervision. Brad Geyser, NSRI Hout Bay station commander, has requested beach patrol officers, through the local ‘Watchcon’ ADT and neighborhood watch, to caution bathers, at Hout Bay Main Beach, of the strong rip-currents that prevail there.

NSRI is urging caution on the beaches. Rough sea conditions and strong rip-currents prevail. We are also urging the public to be particularly cautious at beaches adjacent to river mouths and adjacent to beach outcrops (where rocks, islands, piers and harbour walls jut out into the sea). These places often have strong rip-currents.

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