16 Feb 2011

New paddling wave discovered in Hout Bay

When the sea is flat, you have to make your own waves… This clip shows Rob Mousley and Dale Lippstreu playing in the wake of a big tourist catamaran called Nauticat – in Hout Bay, South Africa.
Clip filmed by Carl Malherbe – thanks Carl!

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14 Feb 2011

Lets start the week on a good note!

Lets start the week on a good note!

With the terrible fire that happened in IY over the weekend, and talk of the World of Birds closing, the week in Hout Bay has started on a negative note. 790Tv would like to to change this. If you have a happy story to tell or a great photo/video you would would like to share, send it to news@790tv.co.za. You could win one of our “Republic of Hout Bay”  t shirts.

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07 Feb 2011

So you missed going to register this last weekend to vote?

So you missed going to register this last weekend to vote?

So you missed going to the Hout Bay library this last weekend, to check whether you are registered to vote in the upcoming municipal election? No stress you can call the IEC on 0800 11 8000 to check. You give them your ID number and they can see whether you are registered.

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05 Feb 2011

CRIME REPORTED between 2011-01-18 TO 2011-02-01

CRIME REPORTED between 2011-01-18 TO 2011-02-01

Here is a list of crimes and the times per block in Hout Bay over a little more than ten days…WOW!

Click to download…

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02 Feb 2011

Hout Bay beach part of city “no-go” zone

Hout Bay beach part of city “no-go” zone
By Melanie Gosling/iol.co.za

The City of Cape Town has drawn up radical new draft legislation which will effectively create a zone around the peninsula’s 300km coastline in which no further development will be allowed.

The buffer zone will vary from 100m from the high water mark to as much as a kilometre in others, particularly on the West Coast.

The purpose of the new law is to put paid to development built too close to the coast, which the city says is both unsightly and often cuts the public off from the sea. It also costs ratepayers dearly to maintain and repair development damaged by natural coastal processes, such as wind-blown sand, wave erosion and damage from storm surges.

Cape Town is the first city in the world to create a no-go zone to protect its coast.

Gregg Oelofse, head of the city’s environmental policy and strategy, said yesterday that the new legislation tied up with the national government’s Integrated Coastal Management Act, but took it further by creating a coastal protection zone. One effect would be to avoid “ribbon development”.

“It is a fundamental and significant change, and we really hope the public will support it. Essentially we are saying no more land use changes in that zone, no more housing or private developments, no more developments like Big Bay. But we will respect all development rights granted before November, 2010. All that will be allowed in this zone will be development of services, say if a new stormwater outlet is needed. We should have had this 30 or 40 years ago, but it’s not too late to save what we have left, especially on the False Bay coast,” Oelofse said yesterday.

Some examples of development too close to the shore he cited were Baden Powell Drive, which is effectively built on the beach and has to be cleared of wind-blown sand constantly; the beachfront road and buildings at the Strand, the parking lot and sand-blasted buildings at Hout Bay, the railway line at Glencairn and Simon’s Town, which is damaged by storm-driven waves, Milnerton golf course, which is rapidly eroding from wave action, and the Big Bay development which has interfered with the coastal processes so that the beach never dries out.

“At Hout Bay beachfront the city has to remove sand every day from the roads and parking lot and manage it so the dunes don’t march over people’s houses. The Milnerton golf course is eroding from wave action, and south of Diep River mouth at Milnerton the buildings are way too close to the coast.

“Since Big Bay was built, we now have a soggy beach which never dries out – we don’t know why, but it was post Big Bay development. The Simon’s Town railway line is undermined by the sea and at Baden Powell Drive we spend a fortune cleaning away sand. The problems are because there should never have been buildings in this coastal zone, which is dynamic,” Oelofse said.

The coast was Cape Town’s most important asset, economically, aesthetically and as a place which all the public could enjoy. Many of the developments had inadvertently “privatised” the coast because they cut off public access, he said.

With global climate change, sea levels would rise and the peninsula was already experiencing greater wave damage from storm surges.

Councillor Brian Watkyns, who chairs the city’s planning and environment portfolio committee, said the coast underpinned much of our economy and provided for diverse social recreation.

“It is our responsibility to ensure that this asset is managed and protected to serve the best interest of all residents and visitors and for the sake of our future generations,” Watkyns said.

Coastal areas excluded are harbours, Table Mountain National Park and Koeberg Nuclear Power Station.

The draft can be read at www.capetown.gov.za/coastalbylaw or in all sub-council offices and public libraries. The public has until March 2 to comment.

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